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, The Best Time to See the Northern Lights in Norway , The Best Time to See the Northern Lights in Norway

Baltic Travel Blog

The Best Time to See the Northern Lights in Norway

Posted on May 6th, 2020.

The Northern Lights are a huge bucket list item for travellers across the world. But there are only a few places where you can see this spectacular light show.

The Aurora Borealis is best viewed as far north as you can. One of the top countries for Northern Lights seekers to visit is Norway.

But to see this natural light show at its best, you need to be not only in the right place but you need to be there at the right time.

When exactly is the best time to see the Northern Lights in Norway?

When Is the Best Time to See the Northern Lights in Norway?

Given Norway’s northern location in Europe, this is one of the best places to see the amazing scenery of the Northern Lights on a weekend break.

But you still need to get your timing right. Luckily, there’s a lot of room for error in Norway. Across much of the country, you can see the Northern Lights from autumn all the way through to spring.

Autumn

Autumn is the start of the Northern Lights season in Norway. This is the season when they start weaving their magic across the night skies.

The season can start as early as September, when the days start to shorten and the nights begin to lengthen. You won’t see the lights from the city or town. But head out into the countryside away from light pollution, and you’ve got a good chance of catching a glimpse of them.

September to November is shoulder season in Norway when it comes to travel, and you’ll find that things are quieter here in autumn than they are in summer or winter. It’s nowhere near as cold or snowy as later months in the year of course, but the weather is certainly turning.

Northern Lights in Autumn @visitnorway

Winter

Winter is peak season for Northern Lights viewing in Norway, and that’s because this is your best chance to see them.

Conditions are great and, with clear skies, you’ll be able to see the Aurora Borealis almost every night of your stay. You won’t even need to go too far from civilisation either, given the long nights.

But winter can be a harsh time to be in Norway. Aside from seeing the Northern Lights, your options are limited to snow activities and you’ll need good, warm gear. Bad weather can make travel difficult, and it can prevent you from seeing the Northern Lights too.

It’s a fascinating time to be in Norway, but you need to be prepared for endless nights and almost no sunshine, especially in the Arctic.

The winter season usually lasts from November through to February in Norway, with January and February having the best conditions for chasing Northern Lights.

Northern Lights Kjetil Skogli ©

Spring

Spring can be a great time to see the Northern Lights in Norway too. In fact, March is one of the most popular times to visit.

The skies are incredibly clear in spring and, although the nights are getting shorter, between March and the start of April you still have enough darkness to spot the Aurora Borealis.

You’ll need to get out into the countryside to see them at their best. Spring is also a great time for other activities, as the snow starts to melt and you’ll be able to enjoy hiking and camping when you might spot the Northern Lights too.

Northern Lights Spring @visitnorway

Summer

Of course, summer is not the time to be in Norway if you’re looking to see the Northern Lights. While the natural phenomenon does actually continue through summer, you don’t have the dark skies required to see them.

The earliest you’ll ever spot them is when the days shorten towards the end of August, although don’t count on it.

Midnight Sun in North Cape @visitnorway

The Best Places to See the Northern Lights in Norway

Norway is one of the best countries in the Northern Hemisphere to see the Northern Lights in all their glory.

That’s because Norway reaches up to the far north. Conditions in some parts of the country are so perfect that there are certain times of the year that you’ll be almost guaranteed to see the Aurora Borealis.

While you might see the Northern Lights in southern parts of the country in the dead of winter, even as far south as Oslo or Bergen, you instantly raise your chances by heading towards the Arctic.

Tromso is often noted as one of the best places to spot the Aurora Borealis. Tromso is one of the most northerly cities in Norway, and the largest city in Norway’s Arctic Circle. Tromso is often called the Gateway to the Arctic. From autumn through to spring you’re likely to see the Northern Lights here.

Of course, you can head even further north and into the Arctic Circle itself.

Northern Lights above Tromsø Kjetil Skogli © Visit Tromso

What to Expect on a Northern Lights Chase in Norway 

While you might get lucky and see the Northern Lights from the comfort of your hotel room or while you’re walking through the streets – especially in the dead of winter, if you’re staying somewhere remote – you’ll also find that there’s likely to be a lot of light pollution, unless you travel out into the countryside.

That’s why one of the best ways to see the Northern Lights at their best is to get far away from the cities, towns and villages of Norway

The best way to do this is on a Northern Lights Chase, which will have you deep in the Norwegian wilderness on the hunt for this spectacular natural phenomenon.

If you’re in Tromso, the gateway to the Arctic, you’ll start in the evening and you won’t return to your hotel until the early hours of the morning, by which time you’ll hopefully have seen the Aurora Borealis.

Local guides who know the area will drive you out to remote areas of the Norwegian tundra, far away from any light pollution, where the skies are at their darkest.

It’s an epic adventure. With the right guide and the right timing, you’ll be able to see the world’s greatest light show in Norway!

Are the Northern Lights on your bucket list? Contact our experts at Baltic Travel Company today to book your trip to Norway.  


Join our newsletter

Be the first to hear of Special Offers and travel news. To receive our monthly newsletters with more information, on the Northern Lights, the Midnight Sun and all the countries Baltic Travel can take you to, and special offers, please enter your email address and press the sign up button.

We never allow third parties to use your data and we do not keep financial information. We protect your data as if it was our own, because we're people too!


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